…in the pre-Kantian universe, humans were simply humans, beings of reason, fighting the excess of animal lust and divine madness; only with Kant and German Idealism does the excess to be fought become absolutely immanent, located at the very core of subjectivity itself (which is why, with German Idealism, the metaphor for that core is the night, the ‘night of the world,’ in contrast to the Enlightenment notion of the Light of Reason dispelling the surrounding darkness). So when, in the pre-Kantian universe, a hero goes mad, it means he is deprived of his humanity, as the animal passions or divine madness take over; with Kant, by contrast, madness signals an explosion of the very core of human being. Slavoj Žižek, Less than Nothing (via spiritandteeth)

(via imkrebsgang)

worldwartwoinpics:

German soldiers at the checkpoint in France, 1944

worldwartwoinpics:

German soldiers at the checkpoint in France, 1944

Social networking sites like Facebook encourage people to view themselves as perpetual cultural entrepreneurs, striving to offer a newer and better version of themselves to the world. Sites like LinkedIn prod their users to present themselves as a fungible basket of skills, adjustable to the needs of any employer, without any essential characteristics beyond a requisite subservience. Classical liberalism always assumes the coherent individual self as its basic unit. Neoliberalism, by contrast, sees people as little more than variable bundles of human capital, with no permanent interests or even attributes that cannot be remade through the market. Bulletproof Neoliberalism (via ihaveabsolutelynoidea)

(via antoine-roquentin)

“In contrast to the humanist tradition, he [Spinoza] refused to treat “man” as though he is “outside Nature,” as if the human realm is an “empire within an empire…that disturbs, rather than follows, the order of Nature (E III Pref). What has been called Spinoza’s “antihumanism” is…a rejection of the idea that there are special laws that belong to human existence alone, in any of its manifestations.” 

-Hasana Sharp, 'Spinoza & the Politics of Renaturalization' 

imagesofwar:

Soldiers and Red Army officers observe members of the Goebbels family, all now dead. The body of Goeebels and his wife were burned.

imagesofwar:

Soldiers and Red Army officers observe members of the Goebbels family, all now dead. The body of Goeebels and his wife were burned.

(via fuckingfreud)

General, your tank
is a powerful vehicle
it smashes down forests
and crushes a hundred men.
but it has one defect:
it needs a driver.

~

General, man is very useful.
He can fly and he can kill.
But he has one defect:
He can think.

— Brecht, Bertolt, “General, Your Tank Is a Powerful Vehicle”, in “From a German War Primer”, part of the Svendborg Poems (1939); as translated by Lee Baxandall in Poems, 1913-1956, p. 289 (via fuckyeahdialectics)

(via goodadvicegiver1337)

Communism as the positive transcendence of private property as human self-estrangement,.. as fully developed humanism… is the genuine resolution of the conflict between man and nature and between man and man – between the individual and the species. — Karl Marx - Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts 1844 (via dailymarx)

(via an-sich)

notta selfie fan but fer the few

notta selfie fan but fer the few

The Real Other can be encountered as …threatening enigma, …defying representational mediation, …repulsive or alluring. […] Lacan warns, “There is nothing more dangerous than approaching a void.” — Adrian Johnston  (via alterities)

(via alterities)

Thus, Plath’s poem implicitly propounds a new poetics that swerves away from traditional notions of beauty and goodness. The question it raises are to do with how we can live in a world that turns out to be illusory in its traditional form, a world that is not grounded in the Augustinian immortality of goodness, beauty and well-being but in the raw rush of aching, pain and hurt, which - and this is the revelatory or quasi-apocalyptical point - reveal the unethical as the eternal or immortal. — Philosophy and literature in times of crisis
Mack

dailynietzsche:

“Behind a remarkable scholar one finds a mediocre man, and behind a mediocre artist quite often a very remarkable man.”

—F. Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil, §137 (edited excerpt).