Difficult to choose between the big city, where life is stunted, and the small town, where it wastes away.
Ernst Bloch, “Wasteland and Small Town” in Literary Essays.
(via imkrebsgang)
… even calling up old memories and telling oneself idle tales was preferable to enduring the company of people with whom one had nothing in common. The desire to be sociable and mix with other people left him; and again the unhappy truth came home to him that when old friends have gone, one should resolve not to look for new ones, but to live alone and learn to like it. — (via vacantgarde)
in a permissive society, subjects experience the need to have a good time, really to enjoy themselves, as a kind of duty; consequently, they feel guilty if they fail to be happy. — Slavoj Zizek  (via alterities)

(via alterities)

they’re a generation of total narcissists, and now that they are growing old and facing death, they can’t even conceive of their death.

they project their own coming death onto the world. They say, I’m not going to die, it’s the world that’s going to die.

They are individualists who believe that self-expression is the most important thing. This means that what you feel inside yourself, inside your head, is the most important thing in the world.
if the world is all in your head, then when you die, the world dies with you—it ceases to exist, because you can’t express yourself. Because narcissists don’t have anything beyond themselves, apart from their children, which is why these people are obsessed with their children

— adam curtis (via alterities)
  • modernism: dada, finnegans wake, constructivism
  • postmodernism: math equations, boring, gay
In fact we are so unsure hat we cannot grasp the precise meaning that they project onto he terms ‘revolutionary consciousness’ and ‘working class consciousness’. We are also unsure whether these pro-evolutionaries really have a grip on the concepts they perceive to bе indispensable. We try to keep an open mind about the events hat will make up the revolution but we fail to see a revolutionary role for any form of political consciousness, revolutionary or otherwise. Quite the contrary, when we consider past “evolutionary attempts and pro-revolutionary organisation and their political interventions we see in the function of consciousness only an inhibiting influence. — dupont
This is the definition of class hatred… The class war begins in the desecration of our ancestors: millions of people going to their graves as failures, forever denied the experience of a full human existence, their being was simply cancelled out. The violence of the bourgeoisie’s appropriation of the world of work becomes the structure that dominates our existence. As our parents die, we can say truly that their lives were for nothing, that the black earth that is thrown down onto them blacks out our sky. — Nihilist Communism, Monsieur Dupont (via harperisafairy)

(via mochente)

check out this dudechekem out

check out this dude
chekem out

Pleasure limits the scope of human possibility - the pleasure principle is a principle of homeostasis. Desire, on the other hand, finds its boundary, its strict relation, its limit, and it is in the relation to this limit that it is sustained as such, crossing the threshold imposed by the pleasure principle. — Jacques Lacan - The Seminar of Jacques Lacan Book XI : The Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis. Norton, 1981. (via jwes115)

(via imkrebsgang)

Two centuries ago, a former European colony decided to catch up with Europe. It succeeded so well that the United States of America became a monster, in which the taints, the sickness and the inhumanity of Europe have grown to appalling dimensions. Franz Fanon (via the-uncensored-she)

(via mochente)

a Master is … by definition an impostor, an imbecile who misperceives as the outcome of his decisions what actually ensues from the automatic run of the symbolic machine — Slavoj Zizek, 1994 (via alterities)

scrapes:

nov—-18th:

"I have never really understood exactly what a ‘liberal’ is, since I have heard ‘liberals’ express every conceivable opinion on every conceivable subject." — Assata Shakur

image

(via codeinewarrior)

weakness posing as strength betrayed the thought of the allegedly rising bourgeoisie to ideology, even when the class was thundering against tyranny. in the innermost recesses of humanism, as its very soul, there rages a frantic prisoner who, as a fascist, turns the world into a prison. — adorno
minima moralia
uicspecialcollections:

chicagohistorymuseum:

Jake’s hot dog stand, Chicago, Illinois, 1987. Photograph by Patty Carroll.
Want a copy of this photo?  > Visit our Rights and Reproductions Department and give them this number: ICHi-39257.
Connect with the Museum
    

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uicspecialcollections:

chicagohistorymuseum:

Jake’s hot dog stand, Chicago, Illinois, 1987. Photograph by Patty Carroll.

Want a copy of this photo?  
> Visit our Rights and Reproductions Department and give them this number: ICHi-39257.

Connect with the Museum

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Perhaps the best way to describe the diminishing interest in philosophy among the intellectuals is to say that the infinite is losing its charm. We are becoming commonsensical finitists – people who believe that when we die we rot, that each generation will solve old problems only by creating new ones, that our descendants will look back on much that we have done with incredulous contempt, and that progress toward greater justice and freedom is neither inevitable nor impossible. We are becoming content to see ourselves as a species of animal that makes itself up as it goes along. The secularization of high culture that thinkers like Spinoza and Kant helped bring about has put us in the habit of thinking horizontally rather than vertically – figuring out how we might arrange for a slightly better future rather than looking up to an outermost framework or down into ineffable depths. Philosophers who think all this is just as it should be can take a certain rueful satisfaction in their own steadily increasing irrelevance. — Richard Rorty, "Philosophy as Cultural Politics" (via restless93)

(via wittgensteinsmister)